A Few of My Favorite Things {July 2017}

by Elizabeth

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Visiting another local church. Jonathan was scheduled to preach there, and we all went along to watch and listen. The song service was especially meaningful for me as the lyrics chosen were rich, contemplative, and full of truth. The songs have continued to sink deep into my soul throughout the month, and I include links to them at the end.

4th of July Family Day. The U.S. Embassy used to host a 4th of July party, and we miss not being able to participate anymore. So instead, we took the day off school and work, went swimming at a special water park, and then ate sub sandwiches at our favorite sub shop. No fireworks though. We’re excited about next year, when we can celebrate with my Mom’s family in rural Iowa.

A day to celebrate 17 years of marriage. We got a babysitter for the entire day and finished with supper at a rooftop restaurant. (I do love this city’s skyline.) Marriage has been good to us. I know not everyone can say that, so I do not take this gift lightly. All I can do is give thanks for it.

Vacation Bible School at our international church. Missionaries from around the country, as well as tons of local kids, attend this VBS every year. Every year, my kids learn new songs (with motions!) that teach deep truths about the Christian walk. And every year, I get to catch up with friends I don’t often see or talk to.

Chamomile tea. I drank this while Jonathan was out of town, to help me relax and fall asleep without him. Actually I’m back into teas in general, with Peppermint Tea and Spearmint Tea along for the ride, as well as English Breakfast Tea and Darjeeling Tea. Mostly I prefer Twinings.

 

BOOKS

Poppy and Rye by Avi. Clever little social commentary on privilege, anger, and outrage, and injustice. For read aloud time.

Dandelion by Don Freeman, the author of the more famous Corduroy. “Come as you are.” Why have I never heard this story before??

Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze by Elizabeth Foreman Lewis. Another read aloud, this one from our history curriculum. Such a good story. We can relate to life in 1920’s China because of living in Cambodia – a fact which I hope will be helpful this entire year as we study Eastern Hemisphere with Sonlight.

The Complete Lord Peter Wimsey Stories by Dorothy Sayers (a contemporary of Lewis and Tolkien). Simply delightful. Sometimes I need a break from fiction that’s socially conscious, or from non-fiction that’s educationally or politically minded. I needed to get lost in a completely separate world, and one with delightful accents. Still working through these short stories.

Right Ho, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse. This follows right on the heels of Sayers’ stories. I finally finished this Velvet Ashes book club selection from last summer which I for some reason never finished. I thoroughly enjoy reading stories of the British upper classes in the first half of this century. These series are what I call “light reading” — they are not “twaddle.” Although easier to read, they still use language in delightful and surprising ways. I prefer to read them out loud when I can, and in my best British accent. This one is only $0.99 on Kindle.

What Falls From the Sky by Esther Emery. I’d heard really good things about this book but had avoided reading it for a couple reasons – neither of which was because I didn’t want to read it. First of all, at the beginning of this year I made a reading list that included all the print books I had laying around and all the Kindle books I had accumulated over the years but not read. I wanted to read books I’d already purchased before buying any new non-school books. (So basically I made it 6 months.) The second reason was because the easiest way to get this book was through Kindle, but since the book centered on disconnecting from electronic devices and communication, that choice seemed somehow “off” to me. I’d already been experimenting with disconnection from technology and wasn’t sure I needed a guide or story about it. But then Sarah Bessey linked to a $1.99 sale of this book, and I went for it. I am so glad.

Esther, like all good storytellers, somehow manages to tell her own very personal story while also telling the story of the rest of us. It takes my breath away, really. Then again, she is a former theatre director; storytelling is in her blood. Like all stories worth leaning into, this is a tale of brokenness and loss, healing and hope, and running from home and returning there. And the prose. Oh, the prose. There are large swaths of narrative that I just have to underline because the story is so compelling. Not just a pithy line here or there, but entire chunks of text. Note: it might still be on Kindle sale.

 

BLOG POSTS ON THE SPIRITUAL LIFE

On the Silence of God: When He Doesn’t Show Up Like You Need Him To by Rebecca Reynolds. Debunks two promises often offered to young people in American Christianity. Incredibly important.

Patrick Mead on lament.

Roll Away the Stone of Approval Seeking by Kay Bruner. Truth! Approval seeking is a way to control others’ opinion of me and their behavior toward me. And I have often been guilty of it.

Living the Dream by Anisha Hopkinson. All those things you’re wishin’ and hopin’ and plannin’ and dreamin’ for? They won’t fulfill, not really.

Pigeon Loaf, God, and Me by Renee Aupperlee. This post spoke to places deep inside me. If you want read more of my reaction, see my comment at the bottom of the post, which is especially relevant post for fellow lovers of C.S. Lewis’s Till We Have Faces.

Paul’s Uncomfortable Jaunt into Christian Mysticism by Rebecca Reynolds. I have always loved this passage from I Corinthians 1, and this post dives into important issues surrounding rationalism and empiricism. I’m especially interested in this topic as I want my faith (and my children’s faiths) to be both intellectually sound and experientially true. But this is untenable for a faith system. Instead we are left with the spiritual aspect to faith that is proved neither by evidence nor intelligence but is, I believe, supported by both.

 

BLOG POSTS FOR THE GLOBALLY MINDED

God Bless America! (and other dangerous prayers) by Jonathan Trotter.

Both and Neither: Exploring My Third Culture Kid Identity by Chris Aslan.

Celebrating Anne with an E: Orphans in Popular Culture, a 3-part series by Stacie Ellinger. Stacie is a friend who works with local NGO Children in Families. She examines our beliefs about orphans through beloved fictional characters and then offers actual research and data. Parts 2 and 3 are here: Resilience and Reintegration and Family-Based Care in Fiction. Long but thoughtful, especially for those interested in exploring a broader approach to caring for children at risk.

 

BLOG POSTS ABOUT SCIENCE

Why Roman concrete still stands strong while modern version decays. Nifty, huh? Found through Brandy Vencel of Afterthoughts blog. With video.

Researchers Crack the Secret of the Moving Rocks of Death Valley on Interesting Engineering. Also fascinating. Also with video.

Pluto might be a planet again. Let’s talk about why this matters. by Sara Chodosh at Popular Science. I don’t have a nostalgic reason to want Pluto to be considered a planet; I’m perfectly fine with its relegation into dwarf planet or Kuiper Belt Object. I do recoil bit, however, at the implications of this new definition, which would make all moons orbiting planets into planets in their own right. We could have hundreds of planets in our solar system alone; this could get confusing.

All about magnetotactic bacteria, at Does God Exist? Design is evident in even the smallest of living things.

 

HOME SCHOOL AND PARENTING STUFF

Don’t Hate on TV, a 5-minute video by Julie Bogart of Brave Writer.

Working Memory and Copywork, an hour-long interview with Rita Cevasco, speech pathologist and reading/writing specialist. Rita goes into the neurology behind why copywork matters, and I’ve revamped by copywork strategies because of this new information. By the way, working memory difficulties sometimes masquerade as attention deficits; but they’re not the same. Don’t forget to grab the free download.

Take Pain Seriously by Julie Bogart. I’ll be honest. I struggle finding balance with this. On the one hand I know pushing through tears and frustration can teach your child to dislike studying and learning and that we should pay attention to the cues they are sending us. And the younger the child, the more likely I am to pay attention because — on the other hand, I also know that in life we don’t just get to quit when we push up against something hard, and helping our children push through it can build their resiliency, which is especially important in children whose resiliency may be lower.

 

MOVIES AND PODCASTS

Ever After. So old but so good. I watch it with my girls when my husband goes out of town. It’s tradition! The accents are wrong, but everything else is so right.

Teach Us to Want Bible study series by Jen Pollock Michele on Right Now Media. All about desire and unmet desire and disappointment. Every time Jen talks I am in tears. How can a person so consistently speak to the deep places inside me, the places I’m mostly fearful to go??

Ella Enchanted. I had another slumber party with my girls while Papa was away. I remember seeing this movie when it first came out, but didn’t remember it at all, and I didn’t remember thinking I liked it. But maybe Lewis is right: “Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.” Maybe I just had to grow up enough to return to the fairy tales. My daughters, on the other hand, have yet to outgrow them.

 

MUSIC

Hey, Annaliese by Hetty White. I responded viscerally to this song and initially, without words. But isn’t that the point of art, to communicate for us? Since then I’ve been able to put words to my feelings in some email correspondence. For now I’ll just leave you with the song, and the blog post that gives more insight to its genesis.

Bonus Song: When I shared this song with a friend, she in turn shared this song. To be honest it was almost too emotive for me. All the lost things we can’t get back. . . .sometimes it’s too much to consider. And the artistry in this video, oh, breathtaking.

The rest of the songs come from the church service we visited. All of these songs I have revisited and revisited this month. So rich and deep and meaningful.

Awake, Awake O Zion by Phatfish. Joyful, hopeful, and somehow solemn all at the same time.

Awake, awake O Zion
And clothe yourself with strength
Shake off your dust
And fix your eyes on Him
For you have been redeemed by
The precious blood of Jesus
And now you sit enthroned with Him

Our God reigns
He is King of all the earth
Our God reigns
And He’s seated on the throne
Lift your voice
And sing a song of praise
Our God reigns

The watchmen lift their voices
And raise a shout of joy
For He will come again
Then all eyes will see the
Salvation of our God
For He has redeemed Jerusalem

Come People of the Risen King by Keith and Kristyn Getty and Stuart Townend (authors of “In Christ Alone,” “O Church Arise,” and other modern hymns). I’m glad to have discovered more of the Gettys. Too good not to include all the lyrics here.

Come, people of the Risen King,
Who delight to bring Him praise;
Come all and tune your hearts to sing
To the Morning Star of grace.
From the shifting shadows of the earth
We will lift our eyes to Him,
Where steady arms of mercy reach
To gather children in.

Rejoice, Rejoice! Let every tongue rejoice!
One heart, one voice; O Church of Christ, rejoice!

Come, those whose joy is morning sun,
And those weeping through the night;
Come, those who tell of battles won,
And those struggling in the fight.
For His perfect love will never change,
And His mercies never cease,
But follow us through all our days
With the certain hope of peace.

Come, young and old from every land –
Men and women of the faith;
Come, those with full or empty hands –
Find the riches of His grace.
Over all the world, His people sing –
Shore to shore we hear them call
The Truth that cries through every age:
“Our God is all in all!”

The Power of the Cross (Oh to see the dawn) also by Getty and Townend. Many thanks to Pastor Peter for choosing these songs that Sunday.

Oh, to see the dawn
Of the darkest day:
Christ on the road to Calvary.
Tried by sinful men,
Torn and beaten, then
Nailed to a cross of wood.

This, the power of the cross:
Christ became sin for us,
Took the blame, bore the wrath:
We stand forgiven at the cross.

Oh, to see the pain
Written on Your face
Bearing the awesome weight of sin;
Every bitter thought,
Every evil deed
Crowning Your bloodstained brow.

Now the daylight flees,
Now the ground beneath
Quakes as its Maker bows His head.
Curtain torn in two,
Dead are raised to life;
‘Finished!’ the victory cry.

Oh, to see my name
Written in the wounds,
For through Your suffering I am free.
Death is crushed to death,
Life is mine to live,
Won through Your selfless love.

This, the power of the cross:
Son of God, slain for us.
What a love! What a cost!
We stand forgiven at the cross.

Christ is Risen by Matt Maher. Not new to me but always good to sing again.

Let no one caught in sin remain
Inside the lie of inward shame
We fix our eyes upon the cross
And run to him who showed great love
And bled for us
Freely you bled, for us

Christ is risen from the dead
Trampling over death by death
Come awake, come awake!
Come and rise up from the grave!

Christ is risen from the dead
We are one with him again
Come awake, come awake!
Come and rise up from the grave!

Beneath the weight of all our sin
You bow to none but heavens will
No scheme of hell, no scoffer’s crown
No burden great can hold you down
In strength you reign
Forever let your church proclaim

Oh death! Where is your sting?
Oh hell! Where is your victory?
Oh Church! Come stand in the light!
The glory of God has defeated the night!

Oh death! Where is your sting?
Oh hell! Where is your victory?
Oh Church! Come stand in the light!
Our God is not dead, he’s alive! he’s alive!

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